Tea party – Downton Abbey style

What’s even better than having tea at home? A Downton Abbey tea party at a historic museum, complete with vintage clothing of course! I’ve been very lucky to attend two of these, so here’s a little taste of the experience.

IMG_20160117_162012bwHow to Downton

Before you leave the house you’ll have effectively strewn most of your wardrobe onto your bed or floor and found those items from your collection that make you feel like you’d be right at home at Highclere Castle. But nevermind the mess, you can pretend for the moment that your staff has it covered, meanwhile you can clean it up post-tea party to burn off the calories!

For ladies, depending on the era you wish to embody, your outfit for the day might include a tightly laced corset and head to toe early 1900s threads, or you may lean towards more trendy and recent times like the 1920s or 30s, offering looser clothing… besides, who doesn’t have a sleeveless dress and a pair of evening gloves just waiting to be taken out for a spin? And if you don’t here’s an excuse to go find them! A cloche hat will do nicely, or a wide brimmed hat with flowers is also a nice touch. This is a great opportunity to phone a friend and see what they’ve got in their closet, sharing items is great fun and saves your pocket-book!

Gentlemen can have plenty of fun with their duds too…black pants, white shirt with a vest, blazer/jacket or tuxedo tails if you really want to go for it…and why not break out a bow tie or that fancy cravat in a bold pattern or colour! Got a pocket square or handkerchief? Throw that in too. Like hats? This is your lucky day! Pop it on your noggin…just be sure to raise it now and then to the ladies.

Etiquette for hats and gloves? LadiIMG_3241es can leave their hats on the whole time if they’d like especially for a daytime event, even when eating, while gents should remove upon entering the building or at the very least whilst eating. Got gloves? Remove them when eating, however ladies with long gloves can keep them on, although using utensils is highly recommended for obvious reasons!

The arrival  12583744_10208422112858438_1162345724_nb

If it’s at a museum or heritage site,  you’ll likely be ushered into a community room, or in my case, the carriage house at Eldon House. When I’ve attended these types of events, we were welcomed in the entranceway and then led into the tea room. Once you’ve been announced you can proceed to your table, set with pretty tea things and hopefully name cards indicating the seating arrangements.

Taking it all in

Once seated at the tea table, it’s a good idea to do a quick check to ensure all is still intact with your ensemble, since wearing vintage items can have unique challenges. Cloche hat tweaked to the side, hair pins and coiffure patted back in place, jewelry in check to ensure nothing has moved or unfastened.

After confirming you’re not falling to pieces, you can take a closer look at the name cards at your table, get to know others nearby, or do a tour of the room if there’s sufficient space which is a great excuse to mingle.IMG_20160117_133439

Tea parties are especially fun when they’re lovingly planned with attention to detail. At the event I attended the organizers really got into it, right down to framed photos of characters from Downton, delicate china cups and saucers, tea strainers for loose leaf tea, including servers dressed in period appropriate uniforms with aprons who were excellent at staying in character for the party. We were delighted by the creative table cards and the little satchets of tea that were given as mementos of the occasion.

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Time for tea

IMG_3232At a tea party such as this, you can be on the lookout for the first course which will usually be a small sweet or savoury item. But first, you’ll sort out your tea situation…most importantly confirm where your cup sits in relation to the table set up. Tea may be brought over in a pot for your table and the server will tell you what kind and whether it is fully steeped or not. Teas served were special blends from a local tea shop, but in general Orange Pekoe, Earl Grey, Berry blend and a Signature tea. As the tea is being poured, this is it’s good to note where the sugar and cream are located on the table so that you know who to ask and where to reach for it when the time comes.

The food served with our tea was lovely, even vegan palates were accommodated, although a vegan scones can be hard to come by. First was a light almond biscuit, followed by a savory small sandwich or roll. Then came the fancy sweets, and lastly fruit.Tea time lasted nearly an hour with lots of great conversation with friends new and old.

What to do

IMG_3237bEntertainment at this Downton themed tea party included watching highlights from an episode and bloopers from the show. A guessing game was created as well, about character traits, plot details and who said what scenarios… very fun when done in teams. Suddenly everyone in the room got highly competitive! Prizes were awarded to the winning team. Our table didn’t win the game, but we had a great deal of fun.

A visit to a heritage site also provides its own entertainment, so don’t forget to tour the grounds and museum or any exhibits they may have. Even if you’ve been there before,  it’s even more fun to connect with a historic location when you’re in period appropriate clothing.

The Downton tea event was a smashing good time and my husband and I even left with some fun prizes for best attire (otherwise known as best costume). I’m continuing to enjoy the treats from the prize basket including teas, a china cup, 2 excellent Downton Abbey books and our very own miniature model of Highclere Castle. They’re great reminders of  a lovely day.

 

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About Misstoricalfiction

Historian, researcher and writer specializing in historical fiction with a supernatural twist. By day marketing specialist in the insurance industry.

Posted on August 6, 2016, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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