Supernatural tales at Eldon House

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It’s that time of year again. Night falls more quickly than the leaves on the trees and the wind whispers that the dark side of autumn is upon us. Whether our mood is affected by this somber environment or the lead-up to Halloween, either way there’s a perceptible change in the air once we flip the calendar to October.

1-rox-walking2We don’t need to look any further than our own backyards for stories and spaces that match this theme. While many turn to scary movies or haunted houses, this time of year also renews interest in local history, since many stories from the turn of the century are creepy and mysterious, leaving you with a downright bone-chilling feeling.

Eldon House in London Ontario is host to several supernatural tales, including what is thought to be the oldest true account in Canada, of a ghostly apparition seen by several people at once.

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The annual Great Ghost Hunt explores this haunted past by embracing the stories connected to the lengthy history of London’s oldest residence. This year Eldon House Museum has also partnered up with the Grand Theatre, escorting visitors over to the Threatre (or vice versa depending on ticket choice) for a tour of London’s most haunted theatre after touring Eldon.

The museum invites you into the home for just one night before Halloween so you can experience Eldon House’s darker side. Visitors will get an authentically spooky experience with live reenactments, a tour of Eldon’s haunted hot spots, a palm reader and more.

So what is the Eldon House ghost story?
The original ghost story associated with the house, goes back all the way to 1841. The eldest daughter had a ghostly experience that stayed with her forever. Thanks to the popularity of spiritualism in the late 1800s, she shared her tale which was published in a volume of Victorian ghost stories and although names were omitted it spread back to Canada and the rest is history. Both characters in the story were real people and it is told as accurately as possible. More research by yours truly continues on that front.

The story (abbreviated)
On May 14, 1841, Sarah Harris waited for Wenman Wynniatt to arrive at the Eldon House ball.  Finally at 10:15 she saw him appear in the library. But then he disappeared into the dining room, and was never seen again.  The next morning after a search party looked for him, his body was pulled from the Thames River.  His pocket watch was stopped at 10:15.  A rose Sarah had given him was still in his buttonhole.   It seems he kept his promise to attend, if only in spirit.

Other haunted happenings
In addition to hearing from Sarah and Wenman  visitors can learn about the other supernatural occurances that have happened in the home over the years. Objects appearing and moving on their own, a presence on the stairs, and the tale of an eventful seance with a surprising outcome. The trip over to the Grand Theatre will be a spooky one t00, but your good old fashioned guide will light the way and who knows what awaits you at one of Ontario’s most consistently haunted theatres. Maybe you’ll see the Grand’s notorious founder and ghost, Ambrose Small who mysteriously disappeared under unusual circumstances. His ghost is reported to appear all over the theatre. Be sure to save him a seat!
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cl174997-ghost-poster-smaller2Tickets
Join in the fun by reserving your tickets early online or by visiting Eldon House.

Want more on the Eldon House ghost?
For developments on the ghost story sign up for this blog or Like us on Facebook.

In the meantime you can also check out these previous posts and thanks for reading the blog!

 

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About Misstoricalfiction

Historian, researcher and writer specializing in historical fiction with a supernatural twist. By day marketing specialist in the insurance industry.

Posted on October 22, 2016, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

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